Period Seven – English 9 Honors

 

 

Independent Reading for

September 2009

 

Select any book of around 200 pages that you have an interest in reading.  The book may be fiction or non-fiction, on any topic you desire.  It may be a novel or it may be a on a topic that interests because of your career or personal aspirations.  You might ask a parent, friend or older sibling for a recommendation.  Of course, the book should be appropriate for school as well as your age and interest. If you are in honors or interested in moving to the honors level next year, it is recommended that you challenge yourself with so-called great books, the  books that you should have read by the time you reach AP English testing. 

 

If you are in CP or Honors, you should focus on a book that deals with the theme of growing up and “coming of age”. This theme will be explored in much of the literature that we will be reading in class, giving you further opportunities to note connections between texts.  This “inter-textuality” will be a topic of the Honors classes this fall.

 

Then read actively, perhaps using the list of prompts below.  Keep notes during your active reading process.  Do not merely retell plot – repetition is a lower order thinking skill.  Instead, make connections to other books, movies or stories.  Describe how the book reminds you of a personal experience or the experience of someone you know.  Relate the book to other reading or learning.  Your journal should display your awareness of what is happening in your head while you read; your mental activity is the sign of the work of decoding (reading) the text and developing meaning. We call this self awareness of learning metacognition.

 

Your journals will be reviewed and the notes you accumulate through active reading will be the basis of your grade for this activity.  The extent to which you dig further into and beyond the plot of the book will be determined by the entries you make -  both in number and elaboration.

 

Reading must be completed by the week of October 12th; journals will be collected and reviewed that week.

 

Prompts for Active Reading Responses

 

Every time you read, use your journals or notebooks

(or post-its) to actively explore the literature. 

 

First write the date, title of book (or shorthand for it), and pages just read. (or stick a post-it sufficiently large for writing and add just the date – add the title and page now or later when transferring to notebooks)

Then write a response, perhaps using one of the following prompts:

 

Ø      What is confusing or not understood about the reading just completed?

Ø      What is surprising or shocking about the reading?

Ø      Write directly to the author or a character and express any feelings about the course of events in the book.

Ø      “this reminds me of...”

·         something in my personal life

·         something in my family

·         something in the news/ current events

·         something previously read or studied

Ø      What words need to be defined? Find definitions.

Ø      What words/ sentences/ passages impress you so much you would like to remember them? Write those words down. What makes the words important to you?

Ø      Write the subtext or inner thoughts for a character in a particular scene.

Ø      Try to understand the setting or a scene better – draw a picture in your journal (that’s tough to do on a post-it…)

Ø       Write a eulogy for a character that has died.

Ø      What portion made you laugh out loud?

 -- made you cry?  -- or angry? etc.

Ø      Look for motifs and repetition. What emerging symbols, events, characters are utilized to convey the meaning or theme of the literature?

Ø      “This character reminds me of…”

·         a friend, a family member, etc.

·         a character from another book, movie, etc.

NOTE: Do not merely retell the plot or story line.

(Retelling is a lower level thinking skill; use more of your mental ability!)

 

THIS LIST HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED TO ALL CLASSES: STUDENTS SHOULD PLACE ONE IN THE INSIDE OF THEIR JOURNALS FOR EASY REFERENCE WHILE READING!

 

 

ASAP – identify a book for your initial independent reading.  See the guidelines above.  Journals that reflect your active reading will be collected during the first week of October.

 

The first independent reading assignment will be assessed based upon your journal responses (at least 20 entries for a book of approx. 200 pages); journals will be collected the week of OCTOBER 12th.

 

September 2009

 

PHS English 9                Responding to a Non-Fiction Opinion Text                 Mr. Brown

News organizations provide articles explaining events of the world to their readers.  Most of the text of a newspaper or news magazine is made up of such articles.  But another feature of news sources is writing that offers opinions on the news of the day.  These articles are commonly known as opinion writing. They are often called editorial writing. These articles may be the work of columnists on the op-ed pages of a newspaper or magazine. The columnist’s name (and sometimes picture) is placed predominantly on the page or column to indicate the opinion of the writer is the focus of the writing.  Letters to the editor are also opinion, but are submitted by readers of the news source.  We will read four models of opinion writing from recent NY Times to discover the differences between news journalism and writing that is filled with opinion on news topics.  Our task will be to respond to the models with our own thoughts that may agree with, disagree with or extend the ideas presented in the original article. 

 

PROCESS:

           

  • Select a non-fiction opinion article on a topic you care about. The library is full of magazines, newspapers and on-line sources that you may access during our time in the library or from an on-line computer.  The article should be about one to two pages in length (at most). Look for such key search words as: opinion, voice, commentary, op-ed, editorial
  • Show me the article you choose.  I may be able to identify whether the article is too complex for this task.  Most will be acceptable.
  • Read the article several times. 
  • Identify the author’s purpose, position and specific writing techniques used to persuade a reader.
  • Read actively, taking notes in your journal (or on the text itself), and record the cognitive connections you are making with the text. Include thoughts such as:
    • agreement/disagreement with one of the author’s points
    • connections between a point in the text and personal experience or belief
    • extension of a text idea to an area not considered in the text  but important (in your view)
    • elaboration of a point in the text based on your studies or background
    • description of personal learning the text provokes
    • application of a big idea in the text big ideas about our world
    • criticisms of a problem you see in the text
    • thoughts on issues behind the big idea in the text
    • respond to a technique the writer use in the text to persuade or sway
    • etc.
  • Share your piece with another classmate and discuss other points of view that arise

Your task is to:

Create a strong, well-organized extended paragraph that responds to ideas based on reading your chosen piece of non-fiction opinion text.

 

            The ‘A’ paragraph will include:

      • Focus on response to one point or idea in the subject opinion text
      • The title and author of the subject opinion text
      • Full and detailed elaboration on your response to the text
      • Use of effective vocabulary to communicate ideas
      • Fluent structure using correct and varied sentences, including effective use of transitional words and phrases
      • Logical progression and full explanation of ideas/points
      • Effective and economic citation of subject opinion text using the author’s specific words
      • Clear and fluid organization of writing with a beginning, middle and end, while still maintaining the focus of a single paragraph

*Remember: use plain, 12-point font, double-spaced!

NOTE:  While some of our search work will take place during class time, you should conduct your search for an opinion piece that appeals to you on your own time as homework.  We will spend the last four classes in the PC Lab drafting, peer conferencing, revising, re-writing and editing.  The final product will be due on the last day in the lab, September 29th.

 

 SAMPLE ARTICLE AND MODEL OF EXTENDED PARAGRAPH RESPONSE:      (shared in class)

 

            The original article is hyperlinked here:

 

 http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/10/business/10metrics.html?_r=1&sq=Pushing%20Paper%20out%20the%20door&st=cse&scp=1&pagewanted=print

 

THE MODEL RESPONSE IS HERE:

 

 

On a weekly basis I move several pounds of recycled paper to the curb in front of my home.  I enjoy the process for two reasons: I feel it is important to honor ecological ideals of recycling and I love to get all the paper out of the house.  Recently I’ve been hearing about the concept of “going paperless” which is using digital formats to replace the paper that carries and stores all the data I use in my life. Furthermore, in this era of global warming, running a “greener” house would be good for the world too.  In fact, before reading “Pushing Paper Out the Door” (NYTimes 2/10/08), I thought creating a more “paperless” home would be a big step towards being more earth friendly. But Hannah Fairchild makes salient points concerning going paperless that suggest a bitter irony. Digital homes are not necessarily “green”.  Although I might save paper and protect trees, I would use many more electronic devices and consume much electricity.  It’s not a pure “win” situation.  Additionally, am I willing to spend the money or hours necessary to become paperless?  What an expense! According to the article, scanning services cost 40 cents per page or take hours of my valuable time for the transition.  I know I would rather watch a movie than operate a scanner.  Perhaps if the whole family pitched in, we could handle much of that work.  I already get so many of my account statements on-line but still receive the paper copies through the mail.  I get broadway tickets and airlines tickets on-line.  The paper copies could be easily eliminated.   Just as Fairchild suggests, many paper reducing elements of the digital age are part of my household life.  Plus I’d still need to buy many devices to make the paperless shift.  Those purchases would cause considerable but very finite increase in spending.  But I still ask the question: Would the ongoing, daily expense of powering all those devices be a fair exchange for the paper we consume in our home.  While my mind’s not made up, this article has raised important issues I will consider in contemplation of such a switch to a paperless home.  For now, I think I’ll just keep up the recycling.

 

 

 

 

First vocabulary unit:

 

Find ALL definitions and parts of speech for each word. Find a strong sentence for each AND create

 

 

a GRAPHIC MNEMONIC to help you recall the word's meaning.

 

 

 

 

You may work on this sheet, but it must ultimately be attached to your journal pages.

 

 

 

DUE: period 2 - Wednesday, September 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

        period 7 - Thursday, October 1

 

 

 

1

Admonish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

Breach

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

Brigand

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

Circumspect

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

Commandeer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

Cumbersome

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

deadlock

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

debris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

diffuse

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

dilemma

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11

efface

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

muddle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13

opinionated

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

perennial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15

predispose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

relinquish

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17

salvage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

spasmodic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19

spurious

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20

unbridled

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Quiz on theses 20 words on Friday, October 9th. You will need to provide definition or definitions for each word and also provide the part or parts of speech for each definition.  Additionally, you will be given a prompt for response which will have to include 5 of the 20 words in the list.

 

 

 

Coming of Age Literature:

 

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

 

WHAT KIND OF AN ADULT DO YOU HOPE TO BECOME?

            Free-write about a page on this topic. What talents and features do you hope will develop as you become an adult? What dreams, plans and aspirations do you hold for your future? How will  you  get there?

            Since you have submitted your journals, you will have to do this on separate paper and it can be attached later…

 

Due next class meeting: Thursday, October 15th.

 

 

Unit:  Mini-Essay       

Due November 10th

 

Assignment:  To write a mini-essay in which you make a claim (thesis) about an author and his/her way of writing.

 

9CP:  You may choose to write about the book/author you read for Literature Circles (Lipsyte, Alvarez, Zevin, Knowles, or Shihab Nye) or another author that you love.

 

9H:  You may choose to write about the classic text/author that you read (Austen or Dickens) or the modern text/author (Marantz Cohen or Jones).

 

 

What will the mini-essay look like?

 

  • The essay should be typed, double-spaced, 12 point font.  Please use a standard font, such as Times New Roman or Arial.

 

  • The essay should include fully developed, extended paragraphs.

 

  • The essay should be a minimum of three paragraphs:  introduction with thesis, at least one body paragraph, and a conclusion.

 

  • The essay should include textual references (specific examples and quotes) from the author’s book to support and explain and support your claim

 

RUBRIC:  Mini-Essay             

 

 

 

Excellent

20 points

Good

17 points

Adequate

15 points

Needs Work

13 points

Thesis:  There is a clear, distinct thesis that makes an opinion-based claim about the author and his/her writing.

 

 

 

 

Paragraph Development:  Paragraphs are well-developed; they remain focused and stay on topic; transitions between ideas and sentences are smooth.

 

 

 

 

Support: The writer supports his/her thesis with specific examples and quotes from the text.  The examples and quotes are accurate, appropriate, and relevant to the thesis.

 

 

 

 

Essay Organization:  The essay includes at least three separate, distinct paragraphs (introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion) that clearly organize the essay.

 

 

 

 

Grammar/Spelling:  Paragraph is free of errors in grammar/spelling.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Performance Assessment – personal speaking task         due date 11/12

Marking Period One

Introduction:

 

We are at a point in the academic year when we have explored how writers express the theme of “coming of age”.  Using short stories, poetry, novels and our own lives, we have been considering this process of growth.  Now it is time to demonstrate your skills in expressing what you understand about “coming of age”.

 

Your Task:

 

You will create a short film, podcast, or speech that conveys your view on the complexity of transitioning from childhood to adulthood.  Your project should directly address the following three questions:

 

·        What kind of a teenager am I?

 

·        What kind of an adult would I like to become?

 

·        How do I plan on making the transition from adolescence to adulthood?

 

Project requirements:

 

·        Your project must fully address all three questions.

 

·        You will present your film/podcast/speech to the class and your presentation will be graded (rubric on reverse side of this sheet).

 

·        You must include a minimum of three textual references to support your response (characters, quotes, and specific examples from the poems, stories, and novels read during this marking period.

 

·        Only the following materials will be available in the classroom: VCR/DVD player and PC with projector.  If your project requires any other technology, you are responsible for obtaining that equipment or adapting your presentation for on of the available formats.

 

Scoring:         

 

            Please see the rubric:

Name:________________________________                                    Date:____________

English 9 H / 9CP                                                                                  Period:__________

 

 

Marking Period 1:  Performance Assessment

 

 

 

Needs Work

Approaching Expectations

Meets Expectations

Exceeds Expectations

Fully and thoughtfully  addresses each of the three questions

 

 

 

 

Three textual references that support your response  (characters, quotes, specific examples from model texts or lit. circle novel)

 

 

 

 

Project is unique and creative and shows significant effort

 

 

 

 

Speaker speaks loudly, clearly and makes eye contact

 

 

 

 

Presentation is organized and easy to follow

 

 

 

 

Presentation is five to six minutes in length

 

 

 

 

Seriousness of Purpose

 

 

 

 

 

Vocab unit TWO:                     find definitions , parts of speech and sentences that employ the words correctly.

 HW due 10/26; QUIZ 10/30

 

adjourn

 

 

alien

 

 

comely

 

 

compensate

 

 

dissolute

 

 

erratic

 

 

expulsion

 

 

feint

 

 

fodder

 

fortify

 

 

illegible

 

 

jeer

 

 

lucrative

 

 

mediocre

 

 

proliferate

 

 

subjugate

 

 

sully

 

 

 

tantalize

 

 

terse

 

 

unflinching

 

 

 

 

Lit Circle Vocab                       Mr. Pip     Jane Austen in Scarsdale              

 

Find definitions for each of these words, noting the part or parts of speech as well.  Create a graphic mnemonic AND Google a GREAT sentence for each word also.  Put this work in your journal.  Due Wednesday, 12/02/09.

 

pedagogical

bereft

garish

requisite

ruminating

pretentious

feeble

palliative

console

verandah

coherent

ad-lib

adversary

boisterous

consolation

remunerate

intrepid

stipend

flayed

conciliatory

misanthropic

trepidation

pugnacious

 

 

December 9th - Quiz on these words

 

December 10th – collect journals – You journal will consist of reading response log containing notes from active reading of Mr. Pip or Jane Austen in Scarsdale. Also your journal will have class notes on classical Greek theater tradition and practice, as well as homework and other in-class and out-of-class writing.

 

December 15th – quiz on classical Greek theater tradition and practice.

 

Vocabulary words drawn from ANTIGONE:

 

Jan 4th deci 22

 

 

absolve

 

 

anarchy

 

 

aphorism

 

 

augury

 

 

barbaric

 

 

beguile

 

 

belie

QUIZ ON THESE WORDS

 

blasphemy

Friday January 8th

 

carrion

 

 

contempt

 

 

corrupt

 

 

daunt

 

 

deference

 

 

defile

 

 

defile

 

 

edifying

 

 

garland

 

 

graven

 

 

guile

Due jan 13

 

 

ignoble

 

 

ingenuity

 

 

insolence

 

 

inviolable

 

 

lamentation

 

 

muse

 

 

opprobrium

 

 

piety

 

 

portent

 

 

proclamation

 

 

requite

 

 

stealthily

 

 

subordinate

 

 

sultry

 

 

transgress

 

 

untrammeled

 

 

vexation

 

 

wheedle

 

 

woe

 

Find definitions and corresponding parts of speech for each word. Also find a strong sentence that uses each word correctly.

 

 

 

Creating the unwritten scenes from Sophocles’ “Antigone”

 

Now that we have completed an initial reading of Sophocles’ Antigone, we have seen that many events that take place during the action of the play do not happen on stage but are instead related to the audience through a descriptive speech by a character in the play (the messenger, the sentry, Haimon, etc.)

 

For this mini-writing project, you will create the script for a scene that happens during the course of the action of Sophocles’ play Antigone but that the playwright did not write.  The scene should have no more than three characters and entail some event that happens away from the action of Sophocles’ play.

 

  • Try to emulate the meter (rhythm) of the translated poetry as much as possible. 

 

  • Engage in creating speech that captures the minds of the characters and their realization of the powers, both mortal and divine, that surround them in Thebes.

 

  • The scene should not exceed one and one-half to two and one-half pages of written text, formatted as a script.

 

This project is due after our return from the December break.  (Friday, January 8th)

 

 

 

 

Reading Elie Weisel’s Dawn:

 

Read Dawn through page 36 for Friday, January 8th. We will continue the reading at that time. 

 

The text will be explored as homework and class work.  Bring texts to every class.

 

 

Final Performance assessment MP2:

 

Now that you’ve watched 12 Angry Men and read a novel/play/graphic novel that deals with the themes of justice and power, it is time to demonstrate your skills and understanding.

 

Your task: 

 

  • Interpret the text using one of the following:

 

    • Choose a scene to act out as a play (group of 4 or fewer).

 

    • Put a character on the witness stand and have two lawyers (one prosecutor and one defense attorney) question him/her (group of 3).

 

    • Create and perform a dramatic monologue (individual).

 

  • Present your project to the class.

 

 

Project Requirements:

 

  •  All performances must be live (not videotaped or recorded) and memorized. 

 

  • You will present your project to the class and your presentation will be graded.

 

  • Group presentations must be nine to ten minutes.  Individual presentations must be two to three minutes. 

 

  • Costumes/props are required.

 

 

Scoring:  Please see the rubric that follows:

 

Marking Period 2:  Performance Assessment

Performer(s): __________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Missing

 

 

0 points

Needs Work

 

13 points

Approaching Expectations

 

15 points

Meets Expectations

 

17 points

Exceeds Expectations

 

20 points

Fully and thoughtfully addresses requirements of the task

-Scene is not from the text.

-Portion of trial does not address elements of character and plot.

-Monologue is not connected to the plot and does not reveal character.

 

 

-Scene chosen is not central or important.

-Portion of trial addresses

irrelevant elements of character and plot.

-Monologue occurs in the plot and barely reveals character.

 

-Scene chosen is somewhat central/important.

-Portion of  trial addresses

elements of character and plot.

-Monologue occurs in the plot and somewhat reveals character.

 

 

-Scene chosen is important.

-Portion of  trial addresses

 important elements of character and plot.

-Monologue occurs at an important moment in the plot and accurately reveals character.

 

- Scene chosen is critical to the text.

-Portion of trial addresses crucial elements of character and plot.

-Monologue occurs at climactic moment in the plot and eloquently reveals character.

Performance and characters are true to the meaning and tone of the text

-Characters are completely

misunderstood.

-Tone of the performance does not reflect the text.

-Characters have some inaccuracies.

-Tone of the performance barely reflects the text.

-Characters are nearly accurate.

-Tone of the performance somewhat reflects the text.

-Performance accurately portrays characters and plot.

-Tone of the performance accurately reflects the text.

-Performance insightfully portrays characters and plot.

-Tone of the performance enhances audience’s understanding of the text.

Performers speak loudly, clearly and text is memorized

-Performance is  inaudible and unclear.

-Nearly all words are mispronounced.

-Student(s) read(s) solely from script.

-Performance is barely audible and is unclear.

-Many words are mispronounced.

-Text is generally not memorized.

-Performance is somewhat loud and clear.

-Some words are mispronounced.

-Text is somewhat memorized.

-Performance is generally loud and clear.

-Most words are pronounced properly.

-Text is mostly memorized.

-Performance is loud and clear.

-All words are pronounced properly.

-Text is completely memorized.

Presentation exhibits seriousness of purpose

-Students show complete disrespect for the performance.

-Costume/props are not used.

 

-Students barely stay in character and laugh or waste time.

-Costume/props are used, but are irrelevant or inappropriate.

 

-Students mostly stay in character and do not laugh or waste time.

-Costume/props are adequate.

 

-Students stay in character and do not laugh or waste time.

-Costume/props are relevant and appropriate.

-Students capture and maintain the essence of the character; the students “become” the characters.

-Costume/props enhance viewers’ understanding.

Presentation meets time requirements

-Under 4 minutes (Group)

-Under 30 seconds (Individual)

-4-6 minutes (Group)

-30-60 seconds (Individual)

-6-9 minutes (Group)

-1- 2 minutes (Individual)

- 9-10 minutes (Group)

- 2-3 minutes (Individual)

-10-11 minutes (Group)

- 3-4 minutes (Individual)

 

Final live performances will take place during the last three classes of the MP, January 25th, 26th, and 27th.

 

 

 

Final ANTIGONE Vocabulary quiz on second section of list (ignoble through woe) on Friday, January 15th, 2010

 

Read Dawn through page 83 for Thursday, January 14th.

Finish Dawn  for Thursday, January 21st.

 

 

 

MID-TERM EXAMINATION:  Monday, February 1st at 10:15 in room 602

 

Three parts

 

Part one:    ESSAY  A selection of quotes based upon the themes of coming of age and justice/power will be presented along with a writing prompt.  Your challenge will be to create a concise and focused multi-paragraph essay that uses the literature you’ve read and seen to explore the theme or idea presented in the quote. 

This is 60% of the exam.

 

Part two: READING CHALLENGE  You will be presented with a series of reading selections and a series of open-ended questions based upon the reading that you must answer fully using those texts to explain and support.

This is 20% of the exam.

 

Part three: VOCABULARY You will be given a word bank of 40 words drawn from the words explored as “vocabulary” over the past two marking periods.  You will be given a writing prompt (situation) that challenges you to write about that situation or tell that story using 20 of the words in the word bank correctly. (Two points per word used.)

This is 20% of the exam.

 

You have been given a list of words in class that enumerate all the vocab studied since September.  That list is here again:

 

Vocabulary for Mid-term examination – 9 Honors                    

 

absolve

adjourn

ad-lib

admonish

adversary

alien

anarchy

aphorism

augury

barbaric

bereft

beguile

belie

blasphemy

boisterous

breach

brigand

carrion

circumspect

coherent

comely

commandeer

compensate 

conciliatory

console

consolation

contempt

corrupt

cumbersome

daunt

deadlock

debris

deference

defile

diffuse

dilemma

dissolute

edifying

efface

erratic

expulsion

feeble

feint

flayed

fodder

fortify

garish

garland

graven

guile

ignoble

illegible

ingenuity

insolence

intrepid

inviolable

jeer

lamentation

lucrative

mediocre

misanthropic

muddle

muse

opinionated

opprobrium

palliative

pedagogical

perennial

piety

portent

predispose

pretentious

proclamation

proliferate

pugnacious

relinquish

remunerate

requisite

requite

ruminating

salvage

spasmodic

spurious

stealthily

stipend

subjugate

subordinate

sully

sultry

tantalize

terse

transgress

trepidation

unbridled

unflinching

untrammeled

verandah

vexation

wheedle

woe

 

 

The literature we have read and viewed is as follows:

 

“The Odyssey Years” by Thomas Friedman

“Glamour, Nostalgia, and Coming of Age: The Prom as Sacred” by Kelly J. Baker

“Saturday at the Canal” by Gary Soto

“Through the Tunnel” by Doris Lessing

 

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Great ExpectationsGreat Expectations by Charles Dickens

Mister Pip by Jones

Jane Austen in Scarsdale by Cohen

Dawn by Elie Wiesel

 

Antigone” by Sophocles

 

12 Angry Men screen play by Reginald Rose, directed by Sidney Lumet

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Essay on Justice in literature is due on Tuesday, February 23rd (Honors).  The assignment, which we have been shaping in class prior to the Winter recess, and the accompanying rubric follow:

 

 Justice Argument

Essential Questions:

How do individuals find justice in their world?

When should an individual take a stand against an injustice?

 

Assignment:  To write an essay in which you make a claim (thesis) which responds to one of the essential questions about justice. 

 

Your essay should focus on one character from any of the texts we’ve studied to this point. 

 

What will the justice argument look like?

 

  • The essay should be typed, double-spaced, 12 point font.  Please use a standard font, such as Times New Roman or Arial.

 

  • The essay should include fully developed, extended paragraphs.

 

  • The essay should be a minimum of three paragraphs:  introduction with thesis, body paragraph(s), conclusion.

 

  • The essay should include textual references (specific examples and quotes) from the text.

 

  • The essay should be free of fragments/run-ons and should use active (not passive) voice.

 

 

RUBRIC:  Justice Argument

 

 

 

Excellent

20 points

Good

17 points

Adequate

15 points

Needs Work

13 points

Thesis:  There is a clear, distinct thesis that makes an opinion-based claim about one character and the theme of justice.

 

 

 

 

Paragraph Development:  Paragraphs are well-developed; they remain focused and stay on topic; transitions between ideas and sentences are smooth.

 

 

 

 

Support: The writer supports his/her thesis with specific examples and quotes from the text.  The examples and quotes are accurate, appropriate, and relate to the thesis.

 

 

 

 

Essay Organization:  The essay includes a minimum of three separate, distinct paragraphs (introduction, body paragraph(s), and conclusion) that clearly and logically organize the essay.

 

 

 

 

Grammar/Spelling:  Paragraph is free of errors in grammar/spelling (particularly free of run-ons, fragments, and passive voice)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary words for short stories and non-fiction excerpts:  (definitions in text footnotes; provide new sentences for each word and know parts of speech as well as defititions.)

Due when short stories are finished (3/8/10)

Lali

tenement

hue

scarlet

taciturn

 

“Four Directions…”

sullied

concoct

ferocity

scrutinize

appraisal

din

disparage

amorous

pathetic

pawn

slack

guileless

acquiesce

vulnerability

stalemate

tactful

 

Stelmark…”

motley

deride

foray

malevolence

sinewy

epithets

mettle

goad

impudent

brusquely

tendrils

halcyon

 

 

 

 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ English 9                                   Genocide Literature Circles                   March/April 2010

Mr. Brown

 

Enduring Understanding:

How do many readers facilitate reading, understanding and interpreting?

 

Essential Questions:

How do differences among citizens affect society?

What does it mean to be different?

What is the nature of hatred in our world today?

What does hate look like?

How does a free society combat hateful speech and belief in a country that embraces           

           freedom of speech, freedom of belief and freedom of assembly?

 

Overview:

We will begin our exploration of genocide by examining the concept of being different or an outsider in American society.  Our first active reading will be of short stories dealing with the alienation of immigration to a new country.

 

We will read actively, making note of our thoughts, connections, extensions, interpretations, etc., in our journals and then share our responses with classmates upon completion. These notes will be part of your journal/reading response log compilations.

 

We will use the literature circle process to examine and explore the texts in in-class groups. Additionally, each literature circle group will create a project to make a contribution to the idea of ending genocide in our world.  (More on that below.)

 

The Literature:

 

First They Killed My Father Loung Ung

Anne Frank: Diary of a Young Girl Anne Frank

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier Ishmael Beah

 

The Process:

The first step is to choose the novel you wish to read.  The internet will be our source for details about the books; by perusing Google or Amazon.com we will determine which of the books we wish to read.  After making a first and second choice, literature circles will be formed.

 

The Circles:

With your colleagues in literature circles, you will determine the pace of reading needed to complete the novel.  Our literature circle meeting dates will be: 

Monday, March 22nd

Monday, March 29th

Thursday, April 8th

Your circle should plan to read approximately 1/3 of the total reading by each session the group meets.

 

Independent reading:

Each student is responsible for keeping up with the agreed upon reading timetable. While reading, each student should be compiling a reading response log.  Again, this is the sort of active reading we have been developing on all our texts this year. The notes and responses compiled become the fodder and raw material for literature circle discussion.

Your journals and reading response logs will be collected for assessment at the close of this unit.

 

Other literature:

We will also supplement our study of genocide by viewing a film and reading other literature concerning hate and genocide around us.  Groups will also have the opportunity to explore the areas of the world and the time in history that relate to the genocide of their reading.

 

Circle Products:

Each literature circle is responsible for creating a product that supports the group’s response to the novel.  Essentially it will be a response to genocide.  Do you have any solutions for a terror that has plagued mankind for many generations?  What is your response to this human reality?  Is further education, communication, awareness, action, etc., necessary?  What do you want to do as a culminating project for this exploration?

 

In a final presentation, each team must display a response to genocide that outlines a plan or introduces a “product” to prevent genocide from ever occurring again in the future history of our world.

 

Easy, right? 

 

Have fun!

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Stop Genocide Now Group Projects

 

Period TWO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brian Salamanca

Role Playing to

 

 

Stacy Cho

WWII Holocaust

Sang Wan Han

combat bigotry

 

 

Dwight Wise

 

Kejvi Lako

 

"What would you do?"

 

John Donworth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Carmen Wong

Ugnandan Genocide against

 

Jack Wright

Armenian Genocide

Kevin Park

Gays

 

 

 

Albert Kim

 

Mike Hopkins

 

 

 

 

Vana Ekmekjian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Giambagno

Anti-Genocide Snacks

 

Leah Veloso

Roots of Hateful Language

John Fischetto

Donate proceeds to anti-hate groups

Connor Leitch

 

Aaron Freeman

 

 

 

 

Inho Paeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Jones

Darfur

Danny Meyers

Cambodian genocide

 

Joey Rizzolo

Website

Cheyenne Wooten

 

 

 

 

Jon Scrivanich

 

Maria Haines

 

 

 

 

Steve Renzulli

 

Andrew Oh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RUBRIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All group members participate in the preparation and presentation

 

 

 

 

of the project.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Members provide eye contact with audience and can be easily heard

 

 

 

and understood.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presentation is supported by a clearly organized visual aid; its language

 

 

 

is correct and concise.

 

 

 

 

 

The project teaches, informs, or motivates the public about an issue or

 

 

 

event clearly and logically.

 

 

 

 

 

      OR

The project raises money for an established organization

 

 

 

that opposes social hatred.

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

At the same time that we are completing the reading unit above, we will be embarking on creation of our own personal narrative, a similar writing mode to the personal memoir of the current reading selection.

 

Writing Unit III: Personal Narrative

 

Enduring Understanding:  Readers learn more about themselves by reading personal narratives, so personal narratives must reveal aspects of themselves to which their readers can relate.

 

Essential Questions:

1.                  How do writers “mine” material about which to write?

2.                  What methods are available for responding to another’s writing, and how does engaging in such response help both writers?

3.                  What do writers need to consider about their audience as they move from initial to successive drafts?

 

ACTIVITIES:

In-class writing notebooks/journals:

Why do people like to tell/write stories about their own lives?

Why do people like to hear/read stories about people’s lives?

 

Writing Prompts:

The most embarrassing moment in my life…

If I had any moment to live over again I would…

The greatest challenge I have ever faced…

The moment I had the greatest learning experience…

List five words that describe you.

Issue / Person / Moment Graphic Organizer

Peter Elbow Seven Step Writing – Focusing on a photograph

 

Felt Sense Exercise

 

Relationship Web

Map /  Floor Plan as a writing prompt

 

Model personal narratives:

My First Home Run

 

Pre-writing, drafting, peer conferencing and revising.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       Genocide and hatred flow chart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Roots of genocide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

resulting in human:

 

 

 

 

genocide

 

 

 

death

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

injury

 

 

human conditions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

hatred

bigotry

racism

elitism

sexism

too many more to list

 

severity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bias

snobbery

elitism

stereotypes

jokes

 

hurt

 

increasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

fear

intolerance

jealousy

ignorance

want

 

mistrust

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essential questions guiding our unit

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do differences among citizens affect society?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does it mean to be "different"?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How are hatred and intolerance combatted?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the nature of hatred in our world today?

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does it look like?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How can we recognize it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.agahozo-shalom.org

Youth village in Rwanda based upon post WWII Jewish

 

 

 

 

refugee orphanage model from Israel.

 

 

 

www.theirc.org

 

International Rescue Committee - seeking human rights and

 

 

 

 

an end to genocide, exploitation of women and other issues.

 

www.splcenter.org

 

Southern Poverty Law Center - US organization dedicated to

 

 

 

 

teaching tolerance and fighting hate groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

STOP GENOCIDE NOW!

 

As a culminating project for our literature circles work on books on genocide, each group will be responsible for responding to their experience with the topic with an effort to stop genocide (and the factors that contribute to it) from occurring again.

 

Think about how you can oppose the hatred or increase the understanding of individuals so that we have a society that is steeped in tolerance, not rancor.

 

Develop specific plans to:

                        Educate and inform people

                        Help people change

                        Make people take action

 

The flow chart and essential questions on the reverse have been guiding this unit. It shows some of the contributing issues that contribute to genocide. Your projects might focus on much more local issues involving hate or bigotry, perhaps not the huge concern of world genocide.

 

The brief webquest undertaken earlier explored organizations that are already taking action to stem the proliferation of hatred, racism, and violence still occurring in the US and around the world.  As examples, we visited the Southern Poverty Law Conference web site at www.splcenter.org and the International Rescue Committee at www.theirc.org to see efforts at:

·        educating the public about racist threats around us,

·        legal actions taken to defeat hate groups,

·        collecting financial and humanitarian resources for victims of genocide and hate,

·        providing political pressure for world governments to take action.

The authors we are reading chose to impact the world against genocide by writing these books.

 

But what can you do? How about…

·        Create a blog for specific educational or societal benefit?

·        Design a PSA (public service announcement) to inform?

·        Publish a brochure to teach or inform?

·        Create a presentation to teach about a specific genocide(s) (historical, current) so that we will not forget?

·        Plan and design a multi-cultural festival?

·        Plan a seminar to teach individuals tactics for responding to offensive jokes and casual bigotry?

·        And hundreds of further possibilities…

 

All efforts should have:

·        A description of the specific problem or issue being addressed by your project.

·        In most cases, some visual element such as poster, flier, website (mock) and to support the effort.

·        A planned presentation to class to describe or enact the effort.

·        A statement that clearly articulates how your project can contribute to reducing genocide or the hatred that leads to it.

Presentations will be in-class at the end of the week of April 26, 2010- Presentations will be start on May 3.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Genocide vocabulary words:                      HW - Find definitions, parts of speech and GOOGLE or read to find strong sentences. Due MONDAY 5/3; a quiz will follow on 5/10 (Monday).

 

 word  (phonetic pronunciation guide; stressed syllable is in CAPS)

 

usurp (yoo SERP)

 

patronizing (PAY truh nye zing)

 

omnipotent (om NIP uh tent)

 

haughty (HAW tee)

 

despotic (des POT ik)

 

abdicate (AB duh kait)

 

imperious (im PEER ee us)

 

dictatorial (dik tuh TOR ee ul)

 

annihilate (uh NYE uh late)

 

defame (dee FAIM)

 

 

genocide (JEN o cide)

 

 

bigotry (BIG uh tree)

 

 

liberate (LIB er ait)

 

 

desecration (dess ah KRAY shun)   

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Romeo and Juliet

All students will recite from memory the following sonnet that opens this play.  It may be delivered in class the week of 5/17 to 5/21, or it may be recited before or after school in room 602.

 

ROMEO & JULIET

Prologue

                                     

Chorus

 

Two households, both alike in dignity

(In fair Verona, where we lay our scene),

From ancient grudge break to new mutiny,

Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean.

From forth the fatal loins of these two foes

A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life;

Whose misadventured piteous overthrows

Doth with their death bury their parents’ strife.

The fearful passage of their death-marked love

And the continuance of their parents’ rage,

Which, but their children’s end, naught could remove,

Is now the two hours’ traffic of our stage;

The which, if you with patient ears attend,

What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.

 

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

CREATING A SONNET             -            How do we do that?

 

 

FIRST WE EXPLORE SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS

 

What is a sonnet and how do we make meaning of them?

 

Explore Shakespeare’s Sonnets:

 

Using the websites outlined in the folder (in the lab S-drive) for our class’s exploration of the sonnet form, read several of his sonnets, either alone or with a partner.

 

The url’s where we can find Shakespeare’s sonnets are:

 http://www.shakespeares-sonnets.com/           

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakespeare's_sonnets                                                                                          

                                                                       

http://www.everypoet.com/archive/poetry/William_Shakespeare/william_shakespeare_contents.htm                                                                  

                 

Examine the structure of the sonnets:

Note the structural qualities of the sonnets, specifically the quatrains, the couplets, the rhyme scheme and the meter or rhythm of each line of the sonnet.

 

Shakespeare’s sonnets generally take the following form and use this rhyme scheme:

                                                                                                           

                        sonnet parts:                                       rhyme scheme:                        content:

                                                                                    A

                        First quatrain                                                    B                                  Introduction

                                                                                                A                                 of the topic

                                                                                                B                                  or issue

                                                                                               

                                                                                                C

                        Second quatrain                                                D                                 Further consideration

                                                                                                C                                 of the topic; maybe

                                                                                                D                                 a question…

 

                                                                                                E

                        Third quatrain                                                   F                                  Another perspective,

                                                                                                E                                  an answer to a question

                                                                                                F

 

                        Couplet                                                            G                                 Concluding statement

                                                                                                G

 

Note the application of iambic pentameter in nearly every line of the sonnets.  Each line generally consists of TEN SYLLABLES made up of FIVE IAMBS, an iamb being a two-syllable foot in which the first syllable is unstressed and the second syllable unstressed.

 

Examine the content of the poem:

To whom is the poet speaking?  What is the subject of his poem? How do the four quatrains (four line verses) each consider the subject differently, ask questions, or suggest cause and consequence?  How does the ending couplet conclude the consideration of the topic or issue at hand?

 

Note the metaphors, similes and imagery used in the poem

to elaborate and expand on the topic as well as display the poet’s attitude on the issue.  You will want to use this expressive language in the sonnet you create.  Extra resonance and meaning is attached to the topic or issue through the use of this type of figurative language.  Don’t forget personification and other literary devices!

 

THEN WE CREATE OUR OWN SONNET

 

HOW CAN I MAKE THE SONNET FORM SPEAK FOR ME?

Poets write sonnets about matters and issues that are important to them.  So you should start by considering the subject matter for your sonnet by thinking about what is important in your life.  It may be a dream, controversial issue, treasured object, strong idea, special person, favorite activity, etc.

 

Next, brainstorm for words that you associate with this special subject.  Get specific. Have a concrete idea in your mind as you fill a page with words and phrases that come up as you think about the subject.  Think symbolically and metaphorically. When the page is full, try creating sentences and phrases that express your feelings.  If there are alternate views on the subject, you may want to use those to fill one of the response or “differing view” quatrains.

 

You may wish to move to a rhyming dictionary at this time to find appropriate rhymes for your poem.  Remember, Shakespearean sonnets have alternating rhyme and end in a rhymed couplet.

 

Use strong language and attempt metaphorical constructions.  The sonnet may be about aging but the image and metaphor employed may be a tree.  Apply figurative language.  Use specific words about your subject so that the reader has a clear idea and not merely a general notion of your passion.

 

RHYTHM:

Remember that each line needs not only TEN SYLLABLES, but also requires the iambs to be an unstressed syllable followed by a stressed syllable.  Often, the poet switches words in sentences to better facilitate the rhythm he seeks.  Try flipping words; sure, you may not normally speak with sentences structured like this, but in poetry we can do this.  For example, instead of saying:

                        (   ¢    È ) ( ¢    È )   (  ¢         È ) ( ¢    È ) ( ¢    È )        

Foot×ball   is    the    sport   I   love   to  play most.           This meter is the opposite of iamb

 

(   È          ¢ ) (  È   ¢ ) (  È       ¢ )  ( È      ¢ ) ( È       ¢ )

                        Rough    foot×ball  is   the   sport   that    I   most    love   This follows the rhythm of iambic

                                                                                                                        pentameter

ELIDING OR REMOVING SYLLABLES:

Some common words are ripe for shortening through the process known as elision.  When we elide, we remove a middle consonant or vowel from a word and thereby take out a syllable.  We have seen this throughout our reading of Romeo and Juliet.   Some common examples are:

 

even  can become e’en      ever becomes e’er      taken  becomes ta’en      deafening becomes deaf’ning

ACCENTING/ADDING SYLLABLES:

Remember too that you can add a syllable by making a past participle such as deceived (generally conceived as TWO SYLLABLES) into THREE SYLLABLES by placing an accent over the “-ed” making the new word’s pronunciation:

                                      ( È        ¢  )                    ( È     ¢ )  (  È   --)

 de×ceived    becomes  de× cei× ved 

 

Through the application of this convention, we can add syllables to lines of poetry

 

 

RYHMING: 

You have a large store of words in your pre-writing.  Perhaps you already have some key words that rhyme. Maybe there are words for which you need a rhyme.  Look in the online rhyming dictionaries that you can find at:

                                    www.rhymezone.com 

www.writeexpress.com/online2.html

 

HELP IN WRITING:

Several on-line sources are available to assist the sonnet writer.  The following url’s will take you to two of those sites.  You may use the standard link or the “tinyurl” option to access the site.

 

http://www.sonnets.org/basicforms.htm                                    

 

http://www.dummies.com/WileyCDA/DummiesArticle/id-1748.html     

 

 

What you actually have to do is PLAY with words, consider different sentence and word constructions, play with numbers, amass words for end rhyme options, read your work aloud and count out the syllables, hear which are accented and which unaccented.

 

This process takes work. We have three days in the workshop to complete this task.  Use your time wisely!

 

YOUR SONNET IS DUE ON THURSDAY, MAY 13th.

 

RUBRIC:

The construction will be graded on both the SONNET FORM and your EXPRESSION within that form.  The following rubric will be used to assess the final products.

 

Form

A

B

C

D

14lines

exact and unified

Exact

less or more

 

3quatrains - alternating rhyme

thoughts well connected

less  unified

not precise

ramble

1 couplet

clear finish!

rhymes but weak connection

no connection

no couplet

10 syllables per line iambic pentameter

length and meter strong!

10 syls but erratic meter

not consistent

rare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expression

A

B

C

D

Clear Focus

well constructed ideas and images

partial clarity

muddy and vague

?

Use of metaphor/        figurative language

smooth and elegant

Used

lacking

?

Strength and specificity of language

excellent and effective use of strong words

good language usage

mundane language

incorrect usage

 

 

 

Final assessment for Romeo and Juliet and The Sound of Waves – Essay on Character in Literature

 

Essay on Character

 

“Oh Lord, I could have stayed here all the night

To hear good counsel. O, what learning is!”

Nurse Romeo and Juliet III, iii, 169.

 

 

Examination of character through advice given and choices made by individuals in William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet and Yukio Mishima’s The Sound of Waves.

 

Overview

As we have seen in reading and viewing Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet several times, many major characters make critical decisions or actions that have serious effects on them and the people around them. Many characters offer and receive advice and guidance.  In Yukio Mishima’s novel, The Sound of Waves, several characters are likewise given advice and guidance, and they too make critical decisions that have continuing impact on themselves and others.  You have the opportunity to examine both the advice given and the choices made by characters.

 

Task

In a multi-paragraph essay, examine the advice given and/or choices taken by two characters, one from Romeo and Juliet and one from The Sound of Waves. Choose one character from each work and examine how advice given or choices made by one may contrast and compare with the other.  Choose the two characters carefully so that through comparison, the examination of one can shed light on the other. 

 

Content

An opening paragraph will concisely introduce the essay with a thesis statement clearly expressing your controlling idea on the two characters and what you intend to prove in the essay. Each example used should clearly identify the characters, briefly detail the context of the events and finally examine the quality of the advice given or choice made.  Support your thesis with clearly drawn evidence from each work.  You may further support the examination with ideas from your personal knowledge or experience, from another piece of literature, or from parallel event in history or current events. Explore how different choices and/or advice could have resulted in different outcomes for the character.

 

Format

Use a multi-paragraph format, typed double-spaced in 12-point font. Each example may constitute a separate paragraph. Remember that your essay should include clear explanation, including speculation on alternate outcomes, perhaps drawn from the comparative character. 

 

The rubric is as was used for both the mid-term and final examination essays. (See above or below.)

Due Date - June 14, 2010

 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

9 Honors                                  FINAL REVIEW

 

Part One  60%     Multi-paragraph argument essay on a theme from literature studied.  (SEE ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS) Students will have a choice of two options, both of which will require use of two pieces of literature. Responses must be well supported by material and details from the literature.

Works Studied

Short Stories:                                                    Drama/Play/Film:

“Black Boy” Richard Wright                                    Romeo and Juliet  William Shakespeare

Lali  Nicholasa Mohr                                 Life is Beautiful  Roberto Benigni           

“By Any Other Name  Santha Rama Rau                        

Petey and Yotsee and Mario  Henry Roth                      

Stelmark: A Family Tradition  Harry Mark Petrakis

“Four Directions  Amy Tan

 

Literature Circle Novels/Memoirs:                     Novel/Fiction:

Diary of a Young Girl  Anne Frank              The Sound of Waves  Yukio Mishima        

First They Killed My Father  Loung Ung

A Long Way Gone   Ishmael Beah              

 

Part One:  Essay Rubric

 

 

Excellent

15 points

Good

13 points

Adequate

11 points

Needs Work

10 points

Poor

9 points

Development: Writing is unified, adheres to audience and topic, and provides a sound, rational argument

 

 

 

 

 

Support: Includes specific examples and details, as well as explanation of those examples and details

 

 

 

 

 

Organization: Includes logical progression of ideas, transitions, and introduction and conclusion

 

 

 

 

 

Proofreading: Demonstrates proofreading and the correcting of errors in grammar, usage, mechanics and spelling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total points= ______ / 60

Part Two 20% Critical reading section – Answer one of two open-ended questions.

 

 

Rubric

 

Score– 20 points

Student clearly demonstrates understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides an insightful explanation/opinion that links to or extends aspects of the text.

 

Score– 17 points

Student demonstrates an understanding of the task, completes all requirements, and provides some explanation/opinion using situations or ideas from text as support.

 

Score– 14 points

Student may address all of the requirements, but demonstrates a partial understanding of the task, and uses text incorrectly or with limited success resulting in an inconsistent or flawed explanation.

 

Score– 10 points

Student demonstrates minimal understanding of the task, does not complete the requirements, and provides only a vague reference to or no use of the text.

 

Score– 0 points

Student’s response is irrelevant or off-topic. 

 

 

Part Three 20% Vocabulary – Create a text based on a prompt that correctly uses 20 of the 30 words in the vocabulary word bank.

 

This is the list of words covered as a class over the semester from which the thirty word vocabulary word bank will be drawn:

 

abdicate

concoct

disparage

halcyon

motley

scrutinize

tendrils

acquiesce

defame

epithets

haughty

omnipotent

sinewy

tenement

amorous

deride

ferocity

hue

pathetic

slack

usurp

annihilate

desecration

foray

imperious

patronizing

stalemate

vulnerability

appraisal

despotic

genocide

impudent

pawn

sullied

 

bigotry

dictatorial

goad

liberate

rancor

taciturn

 

brusquely

din

guileless

malevolence

scarlet

tactful

 

 

Essential Questions

 

  1. What is the nature of being different in society?
  2. What is necessary for survival?
  3. How does passion affect the choices an individual makes?