Period One – English 10 HONORS

 

 

Independent Reading for

September 2009

 

Select any book of around 200 pages that you have an interest in reading.  The book may be fiction or non-fiction, on any topic you desire.  It may be a novel or it may be a on a topic that interests because of your career or personal aspirations.  You might ask a parent, friend or older sibling for a recommendation.  Of course, the book should be appropriate for school as well as your age and interest. If you are in honors or interested in moving to the honors level next year, it is recommended that you challenge yourself with so-called great books, the  books that you should have read by the time you reach AP English testing. 

 

If you are in CP or Honors, you should focus on a book that deals with the theme of growing up and “coming of age”. This theme will be explored in much of the literature that we will be reading in class, giving you further opportunities to note connections between texts.  This “inter-textuality” will be a topic of the Honors classes this fall.

 

Then read actively, perhaps using the list of prompts below.  Keep notes during your active reading process.  Do not merely retell plot – repetition is a lower order thinking skill.  Instead, make connections to other books, movies or stories.  Describe how the book reminds you of a personal experience or the experience of someone you know.  Relate the book to other reading or learning.  Your journal should display your awareness of what is happening in your head while you read; your mental activity is the sign of the work of decoding (reading) the text and developing meaning. We call this self awareness of learning metacognition.

 

Your journals will be reviewed and the notes you accumulate through active reading will be the basis of your grade for this activity.  The extent to which you dig further into and beyond the plot of the book will be determined by the entries you make -  both in number and elaboration.

 

Reading must be completed by the week of October 12th; journals will be collected and reviewed that week.

 

Prompts for Active Reading Responses

 

Every time you read, use your journals or notebooks

(or post-its) to actively explore the literature. 

 

First write the date, title of book (or shorthand for it), and pages just read. (or stick a post-it sufficiently large for writing and add just the date – add the title and page now or later when transferring to notebooks)

Then write a response, perhaps using one of the following prompts:

 

Ø      What is confusing or not understood about the reading just completed?

Ø      What is surprising or shocking about the reading?

Ø      Write directly to the author or a character and express any feelings about the course of events in the book.

Ø      “this reminds me of...”

·         something in my personal life

·         something in my family

·         something in the news/ current events

·         something previously read or studied

Ø      What words need to be defined? Find definitions.

Ø      What words/ sentences/ passages impress you so much you would like to remember them? Write those words down. What makes the words important to you?

Ø      Write the subtext or inner thoughts for a character in a particular scene.

Ø      Try to understand the setting or a scene better – draw a picture in your journal (that’s tough to do on a post-it…)

Ø       Write a eulogy for a character that has died.

Ø      What portion made you laugh out loud?

 -- made you cry?  -- or angry? etc.

Ø      Look for motifs and repetition. What emerging symbols, events, characters are utilized to convey the meaning or theme of the literature?

Ø      “This character reminds me of…”

·         a friend, a family member, etc.

·         a character from another book, movie, etc.

NOTE: Do not merely retell the plot or story line.

(Retelling is a lower level thinking skill; use more of your mental ability!)

 

THIS LIST HAS BEEN DISTRIBUTED TO ALL CLASSES: STUDENTS SHOULD PLACE ONE IN THE INSIDE OF THEIR JOURNALS FOR EASY REFERENCE WHILE READING!

 

 

“This I Believe…” curriculum and plans at www.thisibelieve.org

 

Final product of “This I Believe…” essay due September 29th.

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Vocabulary challenge:

Find ALL definitions and parts of speech for each word.  Find a strong sentence for each AND create a GRAPHIC MNEMONIC to help you recall the word’s meaning.

Complete for Thursday October 1st.  Use this sheet if you wish or create 3x5’s for portable word wall.  If you use this sheet, attach it to your journal.

 

 

ABATE

 

BRAZEN

 

DAUNT

 

ENCUMBRANCE

 

ABHOR

 

BRUSQUE

 

DEARTH

 

ENERVATE

 

ABSTINENCE

 

BUOYANT

 

DEBILITATE

 

ENIGMATIC

 

ABSTRUSE

 

BURGEON

 

DEBUNK

 

ENTHRALL

 

ACCLAIM

 

BUTTRESS

 

DECORUM

 

ENTICE

 

Vocabulary quiz on MONDAY, October 9th.   Matching and application of words in a written context. You will be given a prompt and will need to apply a number of the 20 words in your response.

 

 

 

 

 

Expression of Belief in Alternate Media

 

Introduction:

Now that we have explored an element of our knowledge and belief about our world and expressed it in a personal essay, we will embark on a project that requires us to express that belief through visual and sound elements.  We will ask ourselves: What does our belief look like?  What sounds/music/rhythms express our belief? 

 

Task:

Your task is to create an audio-visual presentation of 3 to 5 minutes duration using a computer program such as iMovie, MovieMaker, Photo Story 3, etc. PhotoStory3 is the recommended program; it will be available on our school PC’s.  Additionally, it is a free download to your home PC. 

 

Process:

In addition to asking the basic questions posed in the introduction, collection of visual images and sound pieces will be the earliest task you will undertake. Convert all pieces into a data format and store on a reliable (and large) storage drive, such as a FlashDrive.

We will have access to a scanner in the PC lab.  ]

 

You may capture music on an iPod, and images/photographs on cameras or phones. These devices may be used during class time for the purpose of downloading media only. 

 

We will have three days in the Library Annex PC lab: November 2nd, 3rd, and 9th.  Much of this process will be completed outside of class.  PhotoStory3 is therefore recommended to maximize home and PC lab time.

 

At this time, we have ability to project only PhotoStory3 or MovieMaker in our classrooms. iMovie programs may or may not be available for our set up.  If you choose to bring a Mac laptop into class, iMovie may be an option.

 

Presentations will be made in class at the end of the week of 11/09.

 

 

 

 

Mini-Author Study – Romantic Authors

 

 

Introduction:

 

Over the past several weeks you have been reading works by three American writers: Hawthorne, Poe and King.  We have been discovering several strands that offer connections among each author’s works.  This min-author study will result in a multi-paragraph essay in which you will explore and analyze one of these connective strands, whether between multiple works by a single author or between works by different authors.

 

 

Task:

 

The essay you create will stem from a well-formulated thesis statement in your introductory paragraph and be explained, supported and proven in your body paragraphs. The essay may explore the relationship between an author and his work(s) showing the personal source of the writer’s work. Another option is to explain an author’s purpose in exploring a particular theme or using a writing element in more than one of his texts. Or perhaps you have discovered similarities between two writers in terms of their respective styles, thematic involvement, settings, characterization, plot devices, etc., in specific works.  Exploring this inter-textuality (relations and connections between or among different texts) is the essence of this mini-author study.

 

 

Product:

 

The final product will take the form of a multi-paragraph essay stating a clear thesis in paragraph one and exploring, explaining and proving that thesis in the body paragraphs.  Finally, the essay will close with a paragraph that not only completes the writing, but also provides an overview of the discovery and learning the essay conveys.  Each essay will be typed double-spaced in 12-point plain font with one-inch margins.  You may engage in research on your selected author and use your text to cite the source of information.  In-text or bibliographic citation is not necessary.

 

Due date:  Friday, November 13th.

 

 

 

 

 

VOCAB UNIT 2

Find ALL definitions and parts of speech for each word.  Find a strong sentence for each AND create a GRAPHIC MNEMONIC to help you recall the word’s meaning.

Complete for Monday October 26th.  Use this sheet if you wish or create 3x5’s for portable word wall.  If you use this sheet, attach it to your journal.

QUIZ 10/30

 

ACCORD

 

CACOPHONY

 

DECRY

 

ENTRENCH

 

ACRIMONY

 

CAJOLE

 

DEFER

 

ENUMERATE

 

ADEPT

 

CALLOUS

 

DELETERIOUS

 

EPHEMERAL

 

ADMONISH

 

CAMARADERIE

 

DELINEATE

 

EPITOMIZE

 

ADROIT

 

CANDID

 

DEMEAN

 

EQUANIMITY

 

 

Exploration of Theme – the Literature of DYSTOPIA

 

Essential Questions:

 

  1. What is the role of an individual in society?
  2. What is the price of conformity / nonconformity?
  3. How does society shape perception?
  4. Are individuals products of society?
  5. Is it possible to develop an individual sense of self?

 

 

 

Readings:          “Subdivision” by Rush (lyric)

                        “Won’t Get Fooled Again” The Who (lyric)

                        “The Unknown Citizen” W. H. Auden (poem)

                        The Lord of the Flies William Golding (novel)

                        “Metropolis” Fritz Lang (film)

                        “Pleasantville” Gary Ross (film)

                        “Harrison Bergeron” Kurt Vonnegut (short story)

                        “The Lottery” Shirley Jackson (short story)

                        “The Ones Who Walk Away from the Omelas” Ursela LeGuin

                        “The Machine Stops” E.M. Forester

                        non-fiction: “America’s Nightmare: The Obama Dystopia”

 

Read actively, compiling reading response notes in your journals, the chapters of The Lord of the Flies on the following schedule:

 

December 7th               Complete Chapters 1 & 2

December 10th             Complete Chapters 3 & 4

December 11th             Vocabulary quiz on the first four chapters of LOF. (see following list)

December 14th             Complete Chapters 5 & 6

December 15th             Journal collection (returned 12/17)

January 5th                    Complete novel chapters 7-12.

Januarty 13th                 Vocabulary quiz on the remaining words from chapters 5 to 12.

 

As you read The Lord of the Flies, consider the efforts made by characters to form a society. 

  • What are the principles of the societies proposed?
  • Which of the characters who attempt leadership would you most likely follow?
  • What about that character makes him a valuable leader? 
  • What motivates the various characters in this novel?
  • What symbols do you see in the text? What do these symbols represent?
  • and more in class…

 

VOCABULARY FOR LORD OF THE FLIES:

 

Ch. 1 & 2

 

 

Ch. 3 & 4

ebullience

 

 

antagonism

effulgence

 

 

belligerence

enmity

 

 

incursion

furtive

 

 

indignant

gesticulate

 

 

ingracious

incredulous

 

 

susurration

intricacy

 

 

tacit

irrelevance

 

 

vicissitude

motif

 

 

 

strident

 

 

 

suffusion

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ch. 5 & 6

 

 

Ch. 7 & 8

diffident

 

 

bravado

effigy

 

 

covert

emphatic

 

 

cynicism

improvisation

 

decorum

leviathan

 

 

expedition

solemnity

 

 

sanctity

 

 

 

 

Ch. 9 & 10

 

 

Ch. 11 & 12

convulsive

 

 

cessation

derision

 

 

derisive

implication

 

 

ensconce

saunter

 

 

ferocity

succulent

 

 

ludicrous

superficial

 

 

multitudinous

 

 

 

myopia

 

 

 

simpleton

 

 

 

truculent

 

INCLUDE DEFINITIONS

FOR THESE WORDS IN

YOUR JOURNALS! 

QUIZZES 1/13

and 1/20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JOURNALS COLLECTED JANUARY 14th.

 

Vocabulary words for chapters 9 through 12 HW due 1/18; Quiz on 1/20.

 

 

 

 

 

MID-TERM EXAMINATION

 

The mid-term exam is divided into two parts. 

The first part is a reading selection with open-ended questions that follow asking you to link this reading to the works we’ve read over the last few months.

 

The second part asks you to answer one of the essential questions we’ve been considering using any three pieces of literature as support and explanation of a specific thesis you form for your essay.

 

The essential questions and literature are as follows:

 

 Essential Questions: 

  1. What is the role of an individual in society?
  2. What is the price of conformity / nonconformity?
  3. How does society shape perception?
  4. Are individuals products of society?
  5. What is the relationship between chaos and order?

 

****UNDERLINE YOUR THESIS****

 


Honors Summer Assignment Reading (Doyle, Hawthorne, Twain, Bradbury, Updike)

General Summer Reading

Independent Reading

This I Believe essays:

“My Pal, Robert”

“My First Lifeline”

“A Doubting, Questioning Mind”

Film:

Pleasantville

Metropolis

Novels:

The Lord of the Flies

Fahrenheit 451

Anthem

Time Machine

Short Stories:

“Young Goodman Brown”

“The Man in the Black Suit”

“The Lottery”

“Harrison Bergeron”

“The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”

“The Last Rung on the Ladder”

Poetry

 “The Unknown Citizen”

We Won’t Be Fooled Again”

“Subdivisions”


 

 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________The individual in society:

 

We are continuing our exploration of the individual in society by reading J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye.  Students should complete active reading of the first 12 chapters (through p88)  by our return to class after the winter break on Tuesday, February 23rd.

 

Read through chapter 18 (p 141) by March 5.

 

Finish reading Catcher  (p 214) by 15th.

 

The study questions and vocabulary words drawn from the text follow:

 

Study questions for A Catcher in the Rye    chapters 1-8

 

How does Holden ruin the day for the fencing team?

Did Holden’s opinion of Mr. Spencer go up or down during his visit?  Why?

What had Holden purchased in New York City?  What do you feel is the significance of this item?

What sort of person is Ackley?

What sort of person is Stradlater?

How does Holden react to his discovery of the identity of Stradlater’s date?  Why?

What does Holden do for Stradlater?  How does he do it?

Why did Holden take a punch at Stradlater?

Why is Holden crying when he leaves Pency?

What lies does Holden tell Mrs. Morrow on the train?

Who is Hazel Weatherfield?

Are Holden’s memories of Jane Gallagher positive or negative?  Why?

What does Holden think of all the people (including Ernie himself) in Ernie’s Bar?

 

Catcher in the Rye study questions    chapters 9 through 12

 

What is Holden’s first act upon arriving in New York?

What is signified by the ducks in the lagoon?

Why does Holden give such detailed descriptions of the hotel rooms seen from his own window?

What is Holden’s attitude toward sex?

Why does Salinger use the name Faith Cavendish?

Why does Salinger choose to introduce Phoebe here?

What is significant in Holden’s appraisal of the girls from Seattle?

Why does his mind revert to Jane at the start of chapter 11?

Why does Holden think of the ducks again?

What is implied in Holden’s criticism of Ernie?

Why does Holden scorn the “Ivy League” boys he sees?

What compromise does Holden make? (ch 12)

 

Catcher in the Rye    Study Guide Questions  Chapters 13-26

 

Why does Holden accept the assignation with Sunny?

Why is he unable to consummate any physical act with Sunny?

Why is Holden’s mental state after Sunny’s departure?

What is the real outcome of his fight with Maurice?

What is suggested by Holden’s fantasy of “plugging” Maurice?

What progression is followed in terms of female relationships?

What is Holden’s attitude towards the nuns?

What is significant in the reference to Mercutio?

What is the import of the monologue about Catholicism?

Why does Holden describe the child on the street as “swell”?

What does the reference to Hamlet reveal?

What is the basis of the museum’s appeal to Holden?

What is the point of the remembrances of Harris Macklin?

What contradiction exists in his attitude toward Sally?

What is implied by Holden’s recalling Jane in chapter 18?

Why is the Radio City program juxtaposed with Carl Luce?

What is meant by D.B.’s query about Rupert Brooke and Emily Dickinson?

What is the significance of Luce?

What contacts does Holden attempt at the beginning of the chapter?

Why does Holden muse upon his own death?

What is the first impression given of Phoebe?

How are the Caulfield parents depicted?

What is significant in the movie Phoebe saw?

How does Phoebe punish Holden?

What conclusion does Phoebe draw from Holden’s criticism of Pencey?

What is Holden’s answer?

Why does Holden give Phoebe his hunting cap?

What is the import of Mr. Antolini’s advice?

What is the significance of Antolini’s caress?

What is Holden’s condition at this point?

Why does he write Phoebe?

What prompts Holden’s reactions to the foul words?

How does Phoebe identify with Holden?

Why does Holden refuse to take Phoebe along?

What new knowledge does Holden gain watching Phoebe on the carousel?

 What is Holden’s final ironic comment?

 

Additional Catcher reading and response tasks:

 

Read “I’m Crazy” by J. D. Salinger. Characterize the speaker of this story. 

How is he sympathetic? How do you feel as the character speaks to you?  Explore connections you see between the text of this short story and Catcher.

 

Read the NYTimes recent obituary of J.D. Salinger.  Explore connections between the writer and his works, especially Catcher. 

 

Find symbols from Catcher. Compare their usage to symbols in Scarlet Letter, Lord of the Flies or other literature.

 

Follow the arc of Holden’s journey/development through the course of Catcher and compare it to the arc of characters in other novels, in particular Scarlet Letter, Lord of the Flies, and our dystopian novels.

 

What are the significant qualities of the following people/places/events in Holden’s world? (You may not have reached all of these characters/events yet.)

 

Mr. Antolini

Dick Slagle

Ducks in the lagoon

Faith Cavendish

The events at the carousel

Phoebe

Allie

D.B.

Sunny/Maurice

 

Where/ When do you think the major turning point comes in the novel?  What makes it a significant shift?

 

 

Vocabulary Words

1st half of list due Wednesday, February 24th . (19 words)

Quiz on 1st half of list Thursday, February 25th.

2nd half of list due Friday., March 5th , Quiz on Monday, March 8th. (18 words) 

Atheism

Blasé

Bourgeois

Chateau

Clavichord

Cliques

Conscientious

Crocked

Digress

Exhibitionist

Falsetto

Foils

Foyer

Gore

Harrowing

Immaterial

Inane

Infinitely

Innumerable

Lavish

Nonchalant

Pacifist

Pedagogue

Pervert

Provocative

Psychic

Reciprocal

Rostrum

Sacrilegious

Scraggy

Scrawny

Seductive

Spontaneous

Sterling

Suave

Tiff

Verification

 

 

 

Writing Unit – Performance assessment -  reflecting on Catcher in the Rye through a lens

 

Using the Robert Bennet essay on Catcher distributed in class, consider one of the lenses for viewing the novel.  Among the perspectives or lenses by which the text may be viewed include: Psychological lens. Feminist lens, Existential lens, Religious lens – i.e., Christian, Islamic, Judaic, etc., Literary lens – where Holden fits in the range of literature and literary characters, etc.

 

After reviewing the possibilities, consider the lens that provides the most resonance with the view you hold on the text and create an argument for the novel making a statement for the reader when viewed through the lens you choose.

 

Your essay should consider at least three distinct aspects or moments in the novel to provide a clear explanation of the way the text can be viewed in light of the chosen lens.

 

The essay should have a concise and clearly stated THESIS STATEMENT that is supported by at least three body paragraphs and drawn to a close in a well-constructed and meaningful concluding paragraph.

 

Support and exploration will utilize ideas and words from outside sources that must be properly cited using MLA (Modern Language Association) internal parenthetical citation. A works cited page should also be included.  Instructions and lessons defining and learning the MLA style approach will be covered in class sessions.

 

Due: Thursday, April 1st 2010

 

Rubric:

 

 

Rubric for literary analysis essay

 

 

 

 

 

 

How do different readers view the same text differently?

 

 

 

 

How can we as writers make understanding of literature?

 

 

 

thesis statement

organization

support

sentence structure

word choice

gums

A

The thesis statement contains a clear controlling idea, specific focus on topic (lens and elements of text) plus articulation of a comment (opinion) on the lens view.

The essay has a clear and effective introduction (gives reader sense of what to expect), multiple focused supporting paragraphs and successful conclusion (restates thesis and reviews support).  The work is fluent and subtly uses transitional devices.

Body paragraphs are focused and clearly support the thesis. Evidence is explained, elaborated upon and connected to thesis. Sufficient support is provided.

Sentences are all complete, correct and varied in construction. Provide fluency to the overall effect of the essay.

Words are correct, effective and vivid.

Virtually no errors in GUMS (grammar, usage, mechanics,  spelling)

B

The thesis statement contains a controlling idea but may lack specific focus or clear comment; i.e., the thesis statement is lacking a well developed element.

One of the essential elements is missing or under developed.

Evidence is provided but not fully developed into effective support. May lack focus on and connection to thesis. Less support.

Some errors in construction but meaning is generally not disrupted. Some attempts at sentence variety.

Words are suitable to intended meaning.

Some errors in GUMS that do not hinder meaning.

C

The thesis is lacking two or more of the expected elements; elements not clear or developed.

More than one essential element of organization is missing or seriously under developed.

Evidence is not developed into support.  May be lacking in focus or clear connection to the thesis.  Insufficient support.

Sentence construction errors make meaning difficult. Little sentence variety.

Words are misused, inappropriate and/or incorrect.

So many errors that meaning cannot be discerned easily.

D

A clear and workable thesis statement is missing or seriously underdeveloped.

Several elements missing or severely under developed.

Successful support is lacking.  Explanation not provided. Little elaboration on evidence.  Too little support.

Serious errors in sentence construction. Very brief and ineffective sentences.

Insufficient, inaccurate and incorrect word usage.

Lacking in proofreading and/or editing.

 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Choose a longer work of non-fiction for the end of May, beginning of April, to read actively while making responses in your journal.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Imitation is the sincerest form of persuasion…                          MEDIA PROJECT

                        A project in message and style                                                        

 

INTRODUCTION

 

This year we have read a variety of authors who have a style uniquely their own.  Each possesses certain voice based upon the rhythms and tone of the words chosen and the pace and structure of the sentences and paragraphs written.  We have also explored a variety of persuasive writing efforts, most recently advertising and promotion in the media.  This assignment will meld the two areas as we create a campaign to promote or sell the work of any one of the authors explored this year.

 

PRODUCTS

 

Each student will create a mini-campaign that will have IDEAS and PLANS for ONE  of the following and FULLER EXPRESSION of ONE of these promotional elements:

 

  • A visual element for the campaign, i.e. a billboard, a print ad, point of purchase.  (FE [fuller expression]  = create the full work up of the advertisement)
  • Advertising copy for a 30-second commercial for either radio or TV. (FE= create the ad)
  • Promotional ideas for a book tour, product tie-ins, as well as consideration of how ads will be targeted. (FE= plot out the nationwide release of the tour. Answer the question “How will these elements all work together in a cohesive manner?” Execute an actual product. If this is your fuller expression, your press release [see below] will be directly aimed at elements of this campaign.)

 

All students MUST include the following in their projects:

 

  • A fully executed press release written - at least in part - in the style of the chosen author. – SEE BELOW
  • A motto, slogan, or tag line for the author or the author’s work.
  • A visual tag (logo, image, etc.)

 

REMEMBER

 

Keep your intended audience and market in mind as you create each of the elements of the project.

 

Think “cohesiveness” (the thread that unites all elements) as you brainstorm for ideas.  Is there one that stands out as either a more important or an overarching concept? That may lead to a unifying factor.

 

We will have two days in the lab on Monday 4/26 and Thursday 4/29.

Project due Monday 5/3:

 

 

YOU SHOULD BASE YOUR WRITTEN PRESS RELEASE ON THE FOLLOWING MODEL AND GUIDE:

 

How to Write a Great Press Release: A Sample Press Release Template

What is a press release?

A press release is pseudo-news story, written in third person, that seeks to demonstrate to an editor or reporter the newsworthiness of a particular person, event, service or product.

How is a press release used?

Press releases are often sent alone, by e-mail, fax or snail mail. They can also be part of a full press kit, or may be accompanied by a pitch letter.

What is the proper press release format?

Here's a sample press release template you can use to format your press release correctly:

                       

Note: The three #'s mark the end of the press release.

What should I put in my press release?

You need an angle -  something to make my press release “newsworthy”. Make connections, offer perspective on the news or popular culture.

 

 Remember- you are trying to get this into a reporter’s story or TV producer’s schedule.

 

What should I put in my press release?

Imagine this: you run an vitamin web site specializing in weight-loss products. Through the process described in a recent report, you've nailed down a nice, newsworthy topic – teenagers and how they deal with issues of weight. But that's a broad topic, not a story.

In the report, we provided a number of ideas for potential stories. Let's pick the first one and craft a press release.

The story: What do kids think about a "thin is in" society?

As you sift through your message boards looking for quotes, you see a trend appearing. There are lots of messages criticizing Hollywood actresses and pop singers for being too thin. Many girls are saying that seeing these women make them feel bad about their own bodies. A number of the boys are pointing out that they don't find ultra-thin women appealing.

Now you've got your angle -- your hook that will grab a reporter's attention:

Teenagers think that a "thin is in" society pretty much stinks.

Now let's get writing.

Press Release Headline

Before you write a word, remember this:

The reporter isn't interested in helping you make money or driving visitors to your site. He's looking for a story that will be interesting to his readers and pleasing to his editor. He could care less about your great selection, super customer service and commitment to quality. He wants to know only the info that will help him craft a good story about teens and their weight.

Take your ego out of it. Take your natural inclination to sell, sell, sell out of it. Look at your story with a cold, objective eye.

State your most exciting news, finding or announcement in as few words as possible. Emulate the headlines you see in the newspaper every day.

Bad Press Release Headline:
NEW WEBSITE THAT OFFERS HERBAL WEIGHT LOSS PROGRAMS LETS TEENS SPEAK OUT ABOUT WEIGHT ISSUES

Good Press Release Headline:
TEENS: ULTRA-THIN MOVIE, POP STARS SET BAD EXAMPLE

The Press Release Subhead

Subheads are remarkably useful tools, yet usually overlooked by press release writers. Basically, the press release subhead gives you the opportunity to flesh out your angle and further hook the reporter, without stepping on the drama of the press release headline.

 

Here's a headline/subhead combo I might use for this press release:

 

TEENS: ULTRA-THIN MOVIE, POP STARS SET BAD EXAMPLE

 

Website Forumgoers Weigh In: Teens Don't Find Ultra-Thin Celebs Attractive;

Girls Say Negative Self-Images Reinforced by Hollywood's Super-Skinny

 

The Press Release Lead

It's Journalism 101 -- the lead paragraph includes the who, what, when, where and how of the story. If the reporter were only to read the lead of a good press release, he'd have everything he needed to get started.

 

There's no room for BS, hype or sell. Just the facts.

 

Bad Press Release Lead

Recently on theplace4vitamins.com, an online store dedicated to selling the best herbal products, teenagers had the chance to say what they thought about weight loss and whether a society that pressures young people to be thin is a good thing or a bad thing.

 

Good Press Release Lead

America's teenagers are angry at Hollywood for glamorizing ultra-thin bodies, and many girls say they feel too self-conscious about their bodies as a result of watching TV, movies and music videos. The findings are gleaned from more than six months of ongoing discussion and debate at the website theplace4vitamins.com. According to theplace4vitamins.com President John Smith, anger and resentment toward the Hollywood ultra-thin runs deep, particularly among teenage girls.

 

The Rest of the Press Release

The balance of the press release serves to back up whatever claims were made in the lead and headline. In this case, you'd pull some quotes from the message boards (an aside here: if you really were to pull quotes in this fashion, you should only use the poster's name or identifying information with his or her permission. Otherwise, simply say "a 14 year old boy said..." or "a 16 year old Midwestern girl added..." Also, if this technique appeals to you, be certain that a disclaimer appears on your message boards notifying posters that all posts become your property and copyright). Use enough supporting material to make your case, and to demonstrate that, whatever angle you're promoting, it wasn't something you slapped together carelessly.

 

Next, a quote will help put in some perspective:

 

"I was surprised by the level of anger expressed in these messages," Smith said. "Teenagers are far more clued into this issue than most people would imagine."

 

Or, you might ask an expert for a quote:

 

"This demonstrates once again the need to teach young girls and boys about how to develop a positive self-image," said Jane Doe, author of "I Like My Body Just As It Is". "theplace4vitamins.com has done a true service by bringing these attitudes to the public's attention."

 

Finally, spend a sentence or two describing your company and what you do:

 

theplace4vitamins.com was founded in 1997 to provide consumers with a wide choice of vitamins, supplements and herbal products. The site offers a range of articles, research materials and message forums for the health conscious consumer.

 

This paragraph is known as the "boilerplate" -- an old newspaper term meaning a block of standard text that's used over and over again (e.g. the explanation of symbols on the stock price page). In this case, it's text that you might use at the bottom of all your releases.

 

Place your boilerplate right above the # # #'s.

 

One more trick: below the ###'s, add a line that says something like:

 

If you'd like more information about this topic, or to schedule an interview with John Smith, please call Pat Brown at 555/555-2222 or e-mail Pat at pr@theplace4vitamins.com

 

 

Some Key Things to Remember

Stay away from hype-bloated phrases like "breakthrough", "unique", "state-of-the-art", etc.

Always write it from a journalist's perspective. Never use "I" or "we" unless it's in a quote.

Read lots of good newspaper writing, such as the New York Times or the Washington Post to get a feel for the style.

Shorter is better. If you can say it in two pages, great. If you can say it in one page, better.

 

Courtesy of:

Stoller and Bard Communications
6 Horizon Road - Suite 1705
Fort Lee, NJ 07024

 

 

 

Quiz on 5/18 on the following SAT vocab challenge words.  The format of the quiz will be like other vocab quizzes we have recently had.

 

aspire

bilateral

candor

defraud

deity

elude

fixture

handwriting

havoc

imbibe

juncture

kernel

lapse

malady

myriad

necessitate

nestle

obliterate

parse

queue

ravenous

scuttle

thearchy

underworld

writhe

 

 

                                               

                                                30 second Radio Ad Copy

                                                                   and

                                                Synthesis Reflection Piece

 

For your final assessment in this unit, you are to create a 30 second radio ad for an existing or original product. The ad must be presented in one of the literary “voices” that we have studied this year. One example would be Equality 7-2521 from Anthem, selling bolt cutters to break the chains of his fellow workers.  Another would be Hester Prynne from The Scarlet Letter , promoting a personal self-improvement program. The style of the ad must be consistent with a character’s definition or author’s style.  Any book we have read this year (either in or out of class) is appropriate. 

 

Additionally, you are to submit along with the radio ad, a 1 page metacognitive synthesis of how and why you did what you did. 

 

The radio ad should be 1 or 2 pages in length using one of the approved formats modeled below.

 

Each piece is worth 80 points as spelled out on the supplied rubric. 

 

Due: June 7, 2001.

 

Script Format Models:

 

Consulting Firm - :60 second spot
The following radio advertising script was written for a business consulting firm who wanted to show prospects their longevity in the business as well as communicate that they can help see clients' business in a different light. This type of radio commercial advertising uses a popular phrase, "dog-eat-dog" to get the point across.


Sound: dogs growling and barking

Music: Something funky and fast moving

ANNCR: (in a smug, matter-of-fact type voice) Yeah, that’s the sound of today’s business world. It’s dog-eat-dog and only the strong survive. The challenge is navigating the ever-changing business environment. So how does your business keep up with the changes?

ANNCR: That’s where XYZ Consulting comes in. XYZ is an award-wining firm that’s been helping businesses like yours for 18 years. They’ll help you stay successful by navigating change and seeing the big picture. After XYZ analyzes your business and your marketplace, you’ll start to see things like you’ve never seen them before.

ANNCR: And XYZ doesn’t stop there. They use their findings to create a practical plan of action. A plan that will get your business from where you are…

Sound: 3 dog barks in quick succession

ANNCR: …to where you need to be.

Sound: Crash of a gate, dogs whining.

ANNCR: There ya go, lock those dogs up for good by giving XYZ a call at 796-555-5555 or checking out their Web site at xyzconsulting.com. Again, that’s 796-555-5555or xyzconsulting.com.

 

 

John Q. Student

House Rabbit Society

:30  

SFX:

 

OUTDOOR SOUNDS, BIRDS, INSECTS, ETC. UP AND UNDER (03 SECONDS).

ANNCR:

 

(SOUNDS LIKE JOHN CLEESE.)  Reginald X. Tapworthy here interviewing Thurgood J. Moxom, spokes bunny for the House Rabbit Society. Good afternoon Mr. Moxom. How are you today?

SFX: 

 

OUTDOOR SOUNDS, BIRDS, INSECTS, ETC. UP AND UNDER  (03 SECONDS).

ANNCR:   

 

Ahem. Yes, well. Can you tell us about the House Rabbit Society, the international non-profit organization that rescues rabbits and educates the public on rabbit care and behavior? 

SFX:

 

SOUNDS OF SCRATCHING. PAUSE. MORE SCRATCHING (03 SECONDS).

ANNCR: 

 

(UNCOMFORTABLE.) Yes, er, well, I understand the House Rabbit Society is trying to get 1200 online memberships this year. Tell us, Mr. Moxom, what does one get with membership in the House Rabbit Society?

SFX: 

 

OUTDOOR SOUNDS, BIRDS, INSECTS, ETC. UP AND UNDER (03 SECONDS).

ANNCR: 

 

Bunny got your tongue, eh? (LAUGHS) Ha Ha. Yes, anyway, I understand with an 18-dollar membership you get a subscription to the House Rabbit Journal. And the dues go toward rescuing poor, abused rabbits everywhere. Plus you help to maintain the organization's outstanding web site at www.rabbit.org. Care to tell us anything else about the society, Thurgood?

SFX: 

 

CARTOON JUMPING SOUNDS, FADING TO BG SOUNDS. BOING, BOING, BOING... (03 SECONDS).

ANNCR: 

 

Uh. (CALLING OUT.) Wait a minute! Thurgood? Mr. Moxom? (FALSE CONFIDENCE) Well, there you have it. Join the House Rabbit Society by going to www.rabbit.org. And keep those bunnies bouncing happily along.

MUSIC: 

 

THEME FROM "BORN FREE."   UP AND OUT.

ANNCR: 

 

(SHOUTING, AWAY FROM MICROPHONE, GRADUALLY FADING OUT.)  Here bunny bunny! Here little Mr. bunnykins... Bunny wanna carrot? Yoo hoo!

 

Rubric for script and synthesis reflection:

 

Radio Commercial Script and Synthesis

 

 

 

4

 

3

 

2

 

1

 

 

 

FOCUS

Synthesis clearly addresses the style of the chosen author and the impact of this style on the commercial

Synthesis addresses the style of the chosen author and its impact with some lapses in clarity

Synthesis addresses the style of the chosen author with some lapses in clarity

Synthesis is unclear or does not address the topic

The commercial clearly reflects the style of the chosen author and pitches a symbolic product

The commercial generally reflects the style of the chosen author and pitches a representative product

The commercial generally reflects style of the chosen author and pitches an unconnected product

The commercial vaguely reflects the style of the chosen author

 

 

 

CONTENT

 

 

 

 

Synthesis incorporates  “So What?” explanations of specific words, music, and sound effects as evidence in support of the chosen style

Synthesis incorporates  “So What?” explanations of specific words, and music or sound effects as evidence in support of the chosen style

Synthesis incorporates  explanations of specific words and music or sound effects as evidence in support of the chosen style but lacks a sufficient  “So What?” discussion

Synthesis incorporates  insufficient explanations of words, music or sound effects as evidence in support of the chosen style

Choice of words, music, sound effects demonstrates understanding of and investment in the style

Choice of words, music, sound effects demonstrates understanding of, but not investment in, the style

Choice of words, music, sound effects demonstrates partial understanding of the style

Choice of words, music, sound effects reveals weak understanding of the style

 

 

 

ORGANIZATION

 

 

Sequence of the synthesis is clear, including introduction, body, and conclusion

Few lapses of clarity in the sequence of the argument

Some lapses of clarity in the sequence of the argument

Argument is weakened by poor organization

Script presents clear evidence of supported sequencing through the use of purposeful transitions

 

Script presents general evidence of supported sequencing through the use of purposeful transitions

Script presents minimal evidence of supported sequencing through the use of purposeful transitions

Script presents no evidence of supported sequencing through the use of purposeful transitions

 

 

 

GUMS

 

 

 

 

No errors in GUMS

Few errors in GUMS

Some errors in GUMS

Many errors in GUMS

 

 

Name:

 

 

Totals:        _______ / 80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Examination Review Notes:

 

Part One – Response to critical reading –

You will be asked to read a passage and summarize your understanding of the author’s meaning and write a well-developed, multi-paragraph response in which  you relate the reading passage to TWO works of literature we have read this semester.  (See works listed below.)

 

Part Two – Respond to any one of the listed essential questions that have guided our study this semester using any THREE works we have explored. (See works listed below.) You may use an independent reading as one of the works cited in your essay.

 

Essential Questions: 

  1. What is the role of an individual in society?
  2. What is the price of conformity / nonconformity?
  3. How does society shape perception?
  4. Are individuals products of society?
  5. What is the relationship between perceived reality and actual reality?

 

****UNDERLINE YOUR THESIS***

Among the works students have read are the following titles: (Not all students may have read all works.)

 

“Thanatopsis” William Cullen Bryant

 

“Snowbound”      ” John Greenleaf Whittier

 

“Old Ironsides”    Oliver Wendell Holmes

“The Chambered Nautilus”

 

“The Cross of Snow” Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“The Ropewalk”

 

“Oh Captain! My Captain” Walt Whitman

 

The Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salinger

 

Selections from the work of Edgar Allan Poe

 

“Nature” Walden excerpts Henry David Thoreau

 

“Self-Reliance” excerpts Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Dead Poets Society

 

Independent Reading: Non-Fiction